This is an image of how Nic uses the internet.
The basic flow of information is diagonally from top left to bottom right. In short information is gathered on the internet (represented by orange circles) or in the real world (blue circles), then passed through a series of tubes and filters and republished on the other side. New content (purple circles) is also generated, which is similarly republished through a  
There are severas areas that information is gathered and/or generated in, from reddit and real-world friends, to twitter streams and conferences. These different sources are represented by large orange (for internet) and blue (for real world).
IFTTT is the glue that holds much of this personal web together. more on that soon. 

This is an image of how Nic uses the internet.

The basic flow of information is diagonally from top left to bottom right. In short information is gathered on the internet (represented by orange circles) or in the real world (blue circles), then passed through a series of tubes and filters and republished on the other side. New content (purple circles) is also generated, which is similarly republished through a  

There are severas areas that information is gathered and/or generated in, from reddit and real-world friends, to twitter streams and conferences. These different sources are represented by large orange (for internet) and blue (for real world).

IFTTT is the glue that holds much of this personal web together. more on that soon. 

Links to other stuff:
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WikiSeat: Maker Education
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Modularity: What I Make & Why I Like It
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Protofuture: Ideas I haven't made yet
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Maker Cities: The DIY Citiy
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Institute for the Future: My Writing About The Future
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San Francisco Institute of Possibility: For Chaos
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Color Myhology: Modern Myth Architecture
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Science Hack Day: For Science
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CupCake Drone: For Science
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Cobego: An Awesome Design Group
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If A Tree Falls In The Internet: Art and Music
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Book Shelf: Stuff I Read
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Augmented Ruins: Repurposing Infrastructure
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FailThing: When 3d Printing Goes Wrong